If there’s one thing quarantine has taught us it’s to be creative. If you’re feeling like you’re drowning figuring out how to still make this Halloween fun and magical for your little one(s) inspite of quarantine, here is 2 months worth of notetaking of alternatives for your convenience. 😊

Ideas for Trick Or Treating And Celebrating Quarantine-O-Ween

Closed Haunted Houses: Haunted houses are forbidden this year, but if you want to make plans to visit one next Halloween, the Haunted Illinois website has an always up-to-date list of every haunted house or halloween event..

  1. Trunk-or-Treating
  1. Halloween Delivery Robot – if you know how to turn a self-driving vacuum or something into a candy server, this idea is for you. 😊 Click here to learn how to make a Halloween Delivery Robot yourself.
  1. Drive-By or Drive-Thru Trick or Treating

Don’t you love how “drive-by” has become de rigeur or ok to say? Anyway, this no contact trick-or-treat idea for Halloween is like a parade. The idea is kids dress up in their costume and stand in their front yard while parents/people drive by their homes and throw candy that lands on their lawn or what have you.

  1. Andrew Beattie’s Trick or Treat Chute
  1. Distant But Traditional Idea From Tinley Park Mom Anne Lasecki:

🎃 Put large bowls of candy on your yard or on a nice small table at your front door.

🎃 Turn every porch light on. 

🎃 Give away extra candy. **

*”Consider mixing in some non candy prizes too!  My son’s a diabetic now.” 

🎃Sit in your driveway with a costume on. 

🎃Decorate your house more. 

🎃Play music. 

🎃Be extra spooky. 

🎃Buy the BIG candy bars or cool prizes!

🎃Go as far as to set up a drink station for adults (we like trick or treat too). 

🎃Give away hot chocolate. 

🎃Make every house a party! 

  1. Chalk Art Your Driveway or Neighborhood

Turn your driveway and sidewalk into a museum of chalk expression. Help your child(ren) draw hopscotch boxes or lifesize spooky characters for other kids in the neighborhood to enjoy— the sky’s the limit when it comes to what you draw and how. The beauty of interactive artwork like chalkart is that it can have a collaborative element. Draw on each other’s driveways and sidewalks, then leave a little present at their doorstep or behind a bush or flowerpot (i.e. a small ziploc of candy, a stuffed animal, etc.).

  1. Halloween Spooky Scavenger Hunt

Create a scavenger hunt around your house or neighborhood by making a list of frightful clues for your kids to follow. You can make it even spookier by using glow in the dark materials for the hidden items and treats while strolling through a dark evening with flashlights (adult supervision recommended). And if you have unused old plastic Easter eggs, repurpose those or what have you and place candy, tiny toys, or other type of momentos inside them.

  1. Virtual Halloween Party And/Or Watch Party

Most families have had more than their share of Zoom and video conferencing this year, so a virtual Halloween party with friends and family who are not part of your immediate home bubble is a no brainer for these times. Livin’ things up by dressing in costume and having a costume contest. Carve pumpkins together, play a game of spooky charades, do some Halloween crafts, etc.. all from the comfort of your own homes.

After your kid(s) sugar crash— switch things up into a Watch Party, where you are all watching the same Halloween themed movie.

  1. Create Window Art To Display On Your Windows

Remember when window art had a moment in the first few months of quarantine? I came up with this idea back in the early months of COVID-19 because I remember being really into window art as a young child growing up in Chicago. Have your child color and draw Halloweeny things on construction paper, etc. and then tape their creation on your windows for neighbors and trick-or-treaters to see.

What I love most about art in general is that, however ephemeral, these works of art are accidental beacons… signals that tell people quarantine is temporary, but that joy is still alive and well in our hearts.

10. You Got Booed — Kind of like Secret Santa, You Got Booed is where you decorate a bucket or bag of candy and fill it with as much as $25 worth of candy. That bucket or bag of candy is left on whose home you’ve been assigned to. One mom I know named Janelle is the point parent in her neighborhood, which means she was the person who collected everyone’s names and addresses, then assigned which kid would give to another kid. 112 kids are participating in her neighborhood. Impressive, right?

11. Make-shift Trick-or-Treat Wall in front of your front door.

12. Make-shift Trick-or-Treat Table in front lawn.

13. Trick or Treat Candy Sticks On The Front Lawn

What To Do If You Don’t Feel Comfortable Giving Out Treats This Halloween

The Village of Tinley Park created a sign that you can place on your front door to indicate that you are not participating in giving out treats on Halloween.

Treat-or-Treating Hours + CDC Halloween Guidelines


Whatever your decision this Quarantine-O-Ween, there are small ways we can help our kid(s) feel like kids again and for us to have a good time as parents aswell. Don’t be afraid to experiment; trust your gut and don’t sweat this Halloween too much. As long as you try your best, it’s all going to be ok in the end. Just gotta get through this wave.

I’d love to hear what some of your unique ideas are for Halloween this year. Leave your idea in the comments below to help other parents. 🧡 👻

Guidelines, More Ideas, And Further Reading

Halloween Trends 2020

Stressed about Halloween? Think like a Kid

CDC Holidays Safety Page During oronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

13 Wicked-Cool Alternatives to Trick-or-Treating This Year

2020 Haunted Hayrides, Forest Walks, Drives, and More

An ER Doctor Says Traditional Trick-or-Treating May Lead to a Spike in COVID-19 Cases

Halloween Coronavirus Guidance Issued By Pritzker Administration

Halloween Guidelines in Illinois During COVID-19

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